Huu-ay-aht First Nations Ka:�yu:�k�t�h�/Chek�tles7et�h� First Nations Toquaht Nation Uchucklesaht Tribe Ucluelet First Nation

THE MAA-NULTH TREATY

The treaty will bring certainty with respect to each Maa-nulth First Nation’s rights to use, own and manage lands and resources throughout its claimed traditional territory. It will provide the Maa-nulth First Nations with modern governance tools to build strong and workable relationships with other governments, including federal, provincial and local governments.

On December 9th, 2006 Premier Gordon Campbell, the Honourable Jim Prentice, Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and five Chiefs representing the Maa-nulth First Nations on Vancouver Island witnessed the joint initialling of the third Final Agreement reached under the British Columbia treaty process.

The Final Agreement includes a land package as well as funding in the form of a capital transfer, annual resource revenue sharing payments, and ongoing and time-limited funding for each Maa-nulth First Nation. The cost of the Final Agreement will be shared by the federal and provincial governments. The Final Agreement also includes self-government provisions and defines each Maa-nulth First Nation’s rights to resources such as wildlife, fish, timber and sub-surface minerals.

Although the treaty is not an answer to many challenges that are faced in our communities, it does provide a “tool box” for our people to make our own decisions on our own terms. The initialing represents an end to the negotiations and begins a process that will see the Maa-nulth communities fully inform its membership. Nothing is finalized without membership approval.
A treaty will bring certainty with respect to each Maa-nulth First Nation’s Aboriginal rights throughout the Maa-nulth First Nations traditional territory. The treaty will provide modern governance tools that the Maa-nulth First Nations may use to build strong and workable relationships with other governments, including federal, provincial and local governments on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

Canada, British Columbia and the Maa-nulth First Nations expect that a treaty will resolve long-standing issues regarding undefined Aboriginal rights and title, and bring certainty and economic benefits not only to the Maa-nulth First Nations, but also to the entire region.

As it is each Nations commitment to answer every question asked by membership, a community approval process will be initiated by each Maa-nulth First Nation that will include: meetings, bulletins, and telephone calling as well as one on one briefings. Any voting member with questions can also access the website where detailed analysis of the treaty will be posted.

» The Stages of the Treaty

Stage 1: STATEMENT OF INTENT TO NEGOTIATE - Complete

Stage 2: FIRST NATION TABLE DECLARED “READY TO NEGOTIATE” - Complete

Stage 3: FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT: Agreement on Major Issues to be Negotiated - Complete

Stage 4: AGREEMENT-IN-PRINCIPLE (AIP): Maa-nulth AIP approved by members and signed in October 2003 - Complete

»»» Stage 5: FINAL AGREEMENT

  1. The five Maa-nulth First Nations have ratified the Maa-nulth FA - Complete
  2. The Provincial Government has ratified the Maa-nulth FA - Complete
  3. Federal Government - In Progress

Stage 6: TREATY IMPLEMENTED
Treaty to be implemented when all Parties have approved the Final Agreement (Treaty)

»»» = Maa-nulth First Nations current stage of the Treaty Process